Employment

  • Jobs & Employment


    This section is full of helpful advice for young people looking for work. It will help you . . .


    • -Start to think about what you want to do for a job
    • -Understand more about the recruitment process
    • -Know where to look for work
    • -Write an effective CV
    • -Understand different methods of application
    • -Understand there are different types of interview


    LET’S GET ORGANISED!


    Get your preparation right and hopefully the rest will fall into place.

    Think about something you might buy… a phone perhaps.

    You won’t buy the first phone you see without knowing what it has to offer in terms of apps, talk time, internet etc. You wouldn’t just start using it without first finding out how it works. In the same way you need to put some work in to finding a job, to get the best result for you. This means doing some research into what interests you, finding out what’s out there and improving your job hunting skills.

    ACTION PLAN

    You can follow this action plan to get you into Employment. At the top of each section you can check out which Action Plan Points it covers.

    • 1.Think about the type of job or industry you would like to work in
    • 2. Research your career ideas
    • 3. Put your certificates together in a file
    • 4. Identify your skills
    • 5. Produce a CV
    • 6. Draft a letter of application
    • 7. Build up a list of employers
    • 8. Look through job advertisements
    • 9. Apply for jobs
    • 10. Keep a job log
    • 11. Keep a copy of applications in a file
    • 12. Prepare for interviews

    If you think you could do with some expert help you can book an appointment with a Youth Advisor by calling 01202 451100

  • GETTING STARTED


    ACTION PLAN POINTS: 1, 2, 3 & 4

    Havent a clue what to look for?! Here are some different ways that you can get started on finding out what interests you in the work place…

    CAREER MATCHING WEBSITES


    But remember, and this is important: These websites don’t tell you what your ideal job is. They can tell you what jobs match the interests and skills you have. Then you decide what interests you.
    SKILLS HEALTH CHECK WITH THE NATIONAL CAREERS SERVICE
    nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk

    FIND OUT MORE ABOUT JOBS FROM THE PEOPLE THAT DO THEM


    There are some websites here with video clips of people talking about the jobs they do. Make use of your contacts. Talk to people who do a job that you are interested in. Ask how they got into it, what they like, don’t like etc.
    ICOULD
    www.icould.com/buzz

    CAREERSBOX
    www.careersbox.co.uk

    EXPLORE THE LABOUR MARKET


    This method gets you started by looking at what’s being advertised in your local area (or the area you are looking in, if you are prepared to move):

    • •Gather together job pages from newspapers
    • •What stands out to you? What do you like the sound of?
    • •Put a circle around these
    • •What skills / experience / qualifications do you need?
    • •Do you need to improve these before you can get into this work?


    TRY OUT DIFFERENT JOBS

    Get yourself a job and if you don’t like it try something different! You could try ‘temping’ through a recruitment agency. You sign up with an agency and they give you short or long term temp work. Use www.yell.com to look up recruitment agencies.
  • CV’s & Covering Letters


    ACTION PLAN POINTS: 5 & 6

    WRITING YOUR CV

    A well written CV allows you to show the employer that you have the necessary skills and qualities to do the job that you are applying for. It is important that your CV stands out above the rest to get you an interview.
    ARE YOU WORTH INTERVIEWING?
    Do you have the skills, qualifications and experience they are looking for? Make sure you get across your skills, qualifications and abilities, market yourself well but tell the truth.
    NEAT PRESENTATION
    Always type your CV. It must be easy to read with clear headings, good grammar and spelling. Some employers will throw out a CV if there are spelling mistaks on it!
    SHORT AND TO THE POINT
    Your CV should be no more than two sides of A4 and printed on separate sheets. Use bullet points to summarise relevant information. If you don’t have much to put on your CV, just use one page.
    PRINT
    Print on good quality paper and keep it looking freshly printed when you send it off or give it in. Don’t give a CV to an employer that has been folded up and kept in your pocket – this is not a good look!

    WHAT GOES ON YOUR CV?

    • 1.NAME AND CONTACT DETAILS: Set up a formal email address if you don’t have one already – i.e. andy-jones@hotmail.com. Ensure you have an appropriate voicemail message on your mobile incase an employer needs to leave you a message.
    • 2. PERSONAL PROFILE See below for how to write your Personal Profile
    • 3. KEY SKILLSSee below for more information on Key Skills
    • 4. EDUCATION / QUALIFICATIONS Most recent first
    • 5. EMPLOYMENT HISTORY / WORK EXPERIENCE / VOLUNTARY WORK: Most recent first. These can be done as seperate categories or as one category. But only use the titles that are relevant for you. For example, if you haven’t done any voluntary work, don’t put that heading on your CV.
    • 6. OTHER ACHIEVEMENTS: This is your opportunity to include other things that may not fit elsewhere. This could be particularly important if you didn’t do so well in your GCSEs or if you didn’t take any.
    • 7. INTERESTS AND HOBBIES: This tells the employer about you. Interests may include things you are not actually doing, but would like to do. In an interview, you may get asked about these things as a way of relaxing you before asking you the more formal questions.
    • 8. REFERENCES: We usually suggest writing ‘references available upon request.’ But make sure you ask suitable people to be your referees. You often need two : your last employer or school and a personal one such as a family friend. You cannot have a family member.

    WRITING YOUR PERSONAL PROFILE

    Your personal profile is a short statement about yourself that tells the employer what you are like and what you are looking for. This part can, and often should, be tailored to the job you are seeking. If you haven’t already visited www.icould.com/buzz you can complete a short quiz that will give you some really good statements about yourself. Here are some examples…

    • “A hardworking and reliable individual with administrative experience seeking full time employment with training and the opportunity to progress.’’

    • “A caring individual with excellent listening skills who enjoys working with children, seeks the opportunity to gain full time employment to develop a career in childcare.’’

    • ”A self-motivated, hardworking and enthusiastic person who enjoys a challenge and working to deadlines, seeks to develop a career in sales.”

    • “An outgoing and confident individual with good people skills, seeks employment with training in hospitality, and ideally front of house.”

    It’s best to come up with your own examples, but follow the above structure of a beginning, middle and an end. You may find it helpful to ask an Adviser or your parents or friends to help you. You can also download our helpful Buzz Words PDF to get you thinking about your qualities and skills.

    BUZZ WORDS PDF

    KEY SKILLS

    These are skills that are useful in a variety of jobs, or can be quite specific. Again, these may be tailored to the employer you are going to. Here are some examples, but please think of your own too . . .
    COMMUNICATION SKILLS
    • •Good communication skills with the ability to speak with people in a polite and friendly manner
    • •Able to communicate well at all levels
    • •Excellent telephone manner
    • •Excellent communication skills using email, telephone and face to face methods
    TIME MANAGEMENT
    • •Good organisational skills
    • •Experience of working to deadlines
    • •Good time keeping and attendance record
    • •Ability to prioritise tasks
    TEAM WORK / INDEPENDENT WORKING
    • •Reliable and supportive team member
    • •Equally effective at working in a team or independently, with minimal supervision
    • •Good team player
    • •Leadership skills
    SPECIFIC SKILLS
    • •Good keyboard skills with knowledge of work processing and spreadsheets
    • •Experience of Microsoft Office
    • •Health and safety trained
    • •Excellent customer service skills
    • •Experience of bar work
    • •Sales driven and able to meet set targets and deadlines

    Template downloads in Word format


    B-Town CV Template 1
    B-Town CV Template 2
    B-Town CV Template 3
    B-Town CV Template 4
  • GETTING STARTED


    ACTION PLAN POINTS: 7, 8, 9 & 10

    APPLYING FOR A JOB

    1. PHONING EMPLOYERS

    • •Practice by talking you friends and relatives or do role play conversations at home to get used to using the phone
    • •Smile when you dial! Try it, it makes you sound more positive and enthusiastic and it will make you feel good too!
    • •Have a pen and paper ready to write down any information you are given or questions as you think of them
    • •Write a script to help guide your call. Make a list of what you want to say
    • “Hello, can I speak to ………… about the …….. vacancy please?”
    • •If you need to leave a message be polite and say your full name and contact details clearly
      “Hello, my name is ……… I am interested in applying for the vacancy of ……….. Please could you call me back on………..Thank you!”

    2. APPLICATION FORMS

    This is the most common method of applying for jobs, these could be online or on paper. But either way, read and follow the instructions!
    • • ALWAYS read the instructions first and follow them
    • • If there are guidance notes with the application form, read them too
    • • Online – If you need to write a long answer you might find it easier to do this in a Word document and when you’re happy with it, copy and paste it into the application form
    • • Paper – take a copy of the application form before you write on it so you can practice first. You don’t want mistakes or Tippex on your application form that you send off
    • • Make sure you complete all boxes. If any of them don’t apply to you, write n/a or ‘not applicable’ in the box rather than leaving it blank
    • • Keep your answers relevant to the job description
    • • Your answers should be brief and to the point. Keep them honest and factual
    • • If possible, have someone check over your application before you send it
    • • Check with your referees that they are happy for you to give their names and contact details
    • • Take a copy of your completed application form. It’s useful to have this to refer to prior an interview
    • • If you’re also sending a CV, don’t just write ‘see CV’ on the application form. Complete all boxes of the application too but of course, your CV will have the information to help you do this
    • • Make sure you get your application to the employer by the closing date

    3. LETTERS AND EMAILS

    Letters and emails give the employer a first impression of you. Make sure this is a good impression by ensuring your spelling and grammar are correct. Sometimes with emails it can be easy to be informal, but when applying for a job, keep it formal.
    • • Keep to the point, one side of A4 and typed unless your handwriting is very neat and easy to read.
    • • Make sure you include the title of the job and any reference number
    • • Type your letter using a clear font, e.g. Arial
    • • Explain why you are writing in the first paragraph, e.g. to apply for the position of…
    • • In the second paragraph explain why the job interests you
    • • In the third paragraph explain why you feel you are suitbale for the job: relevant skills, education training or hobbies
    • • You can conclude your letter with ‘I look forward to hearing from you’ or ‘I would be happy to discuss any possible vacancies with you further’
    • • Sign your letter off with Yours sincerely (not a capital S) if you’ve addressed the letter to a person by name
    • • Use Yours faithfully (not a capital F) if you’ve addressed your letter as Dear Sir or Madam. Always try to find out a name if possible!
  • PREPARING FOR INTERVIEW


    ACTION PLAN POINT: 12

    APPLYING FOR A JOB

    The key here is . . .

    PREPARATION!

    You will have to go through some kind of interview process to obtain any job. But there are a number of different types of interviews, some more formal than others. The better you prepare, the more likely you are to come across well in the job.

    1. TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS

    These can be used to filter out those that the company wants to see face to face. This may come in the form of…
    PERSONALITY TESTS
    The applicant is asked to give reactions to various statements
    SELLING PITCH
    Applicants are asked to promote a product or service over the phone
    5 TIPS FOR A SUCCESSFUL PHONE INTERVIEW
    • 1. Speak clearly and politely
    • 2. Make sure you are in a quiet area
    • 3. Make a note of your strengths, skills and experience that are relevant to the job
    • 4. Have your CV to hand and some information about the organisation if possible
    • 5. Write notes during the interview so you can refer back to this if needs be.

    2. FACE-TO-FACE INTERVIEWS

    The format of interviews can vary. These are some of the possible forms of an interview . . .

    • • ONE OR TWO INTERVIEWERS
    • • A PANEL OF INTERVIEWERS 3 or more people each with questions to ask
    • • TECHNICAL Where you need to show that you can do the job
    • • GROUP Assesments / activities for several applicants at once

    PREPARING FOR AN INTERVIEW

    1. WHEN AND WHERE?


    • • Check the time and date – if you cannot do this, phone to change
    • • Do you need to phone to confirm your attendance? If so, phone them
    • • Do you know where the interview is? Are you sure? Plan how you will get there. If needs be, go there beforehand to find out where it is
    • • Plan to get there 10 – 15 minutes early. If your interview starts at 10am, 9:55am is as good as late.

    2. WHAT TO WEAR?

    • • Wear something a bit smarter than you’d wear to do the job
    • • You don’t need to wear a suit unless the job you are going for requires this level of smartness
    • • Wear the appropriate clothing for the job, e.g. if you are going for a job as a stable hand, you need to wear riding clothes
    • • Check that what you plan to wear is clean and presentable before the day
    • • Don’t wear too much jewellery
    • • Don’t wear heavy make-up, perfume or aftershave
    • • If you have lots of piercings, take them out unless you are going for a job you know these will be acceptable

    3. WHAT TO TAKE?

    • • Do you need a portfolio of work or equipment to use?
    • • Do you have to give a presentation?
    • • It would be a good idea to take a copy of your CV and a copy of the application form so you can look at these beforehand
    • • Take your school or college certificates and any other relevant certificates
    • • It might be useful to take your birth certificate, passport or driving licence for ID

    4. RESEARCH

    • • Research the company. Find out what you can, so you know why you want to work for them
    • • Think about what you want to know about the company / job. They may even ask you what you know about the company in the interview

    5. AT THE INTERVIEW

    • • Try and remain calm and relaxed!
    • • Be polite and friendly, and smile!
    • • Sit down when asked to do so
    • • Have good posture – don’t sit in a laid back way or in a huddled up way
    • • Don’t fidget. If you have a tendency to do this, sit with your hands interlinked on your lap
    • • Make good eye contact with interviewers. If there is more than one, include all of them, but address the person who has asked the question
    • • Speak clearly, don’t swear or use slang
    • • Don’t chew gum
    • • Be respectful
    • • Be positive about yourself, the job and previous jobs or school (even if you hated them!) Being rude about them gives a poor impression.
    • • The interview is a two-way process so you also need to decide if you want to work for them.
    • • Have some questions of your own prepared.

    Download our Possible Questions Form and use to think of work on your answers. You’ll feel more prepared and have positive things to say without having to think on the spot!

    DOWNLOAD HERE

  • DID YOU GET THE JOB?

    1. YES? CONGRATULATIONS!

    • •The employer will agree a starting date with you
    • •You’ll be able to discuss specific hours, holding time, training, salary etc.
    • •You will be probably have a probationary period – usually 1 – 3 months
    • •You will be given a Contract of Employment to sign. Make sure you read this through and sign and return. You will be given your own copy. Keep this somewhere safe
    • •You will receive payslips with your wages (weekly pay) or salary (monthly pay). Keep these somewhere safe
    • •Keep check of the holidays you take so you don’t take too much too soon and run out
    • •Keep a check of when you are off sick. Most companies have a policy on how much time off people have for being sick

    2. NO? DON’T BE PUT OFF!

    • •Ask the employer for feedback as to why they didn’t think you were suitable, as there may be things you can work on for next time
    • •Many people have lots of interviews before they get a job. Just see it as experience and a step closer to your new job
    • •Speak to an adviser to see what help you can get with interview skills if you think this will help